Given the look of weather forecasts and winter storm conditions coast to coast to coast, this blog post seems so appropriate this morning. With a blanket of snow in several parts of the country, it is hard to believe that the official first day of winter is still weeks away. Cheers to the first snowfall.

No matter where you are in Canada you might be thinking of that first big snowfall. If you recieved this post as a tweet feed you might be thinking “Where are you Ferg?”. The post is actually inspired by the work of Neil Pasricha and his 2011 copyrighted edition of “The Book Of (Holiday) Awesome”.

Neil reveals a series of moments during the holiday season that is just simply awesome.

The moment of awesome that I refer to tonight is that first big snowfall of the season. Growing up in Kenora, Ontario on the northernmost shore of Lake of the Woods, that first big snowfall was often Halloween. We’d put on our snowsuits and our Halloween garb and head out to the streets for trick and treating.

Often times the first snowfall would catch everyone by surprise. In that regard, you might have had a 50/50 chance of a “snow day”. In the north, we didn’t see many “snow days”. In fact, it was kind of a “buck it up buttercup” approach. We are in the north and it will snow. Southern Ontario, I found, was a little less capable of quickly adapting to the first dump of snow.

I remember when I was a young District Manager at Molson in the 90’s. If I had my team meeting on Monday and a snowfall was forecasted, I would just plan to get there early. My team would arrive late and complain of the snowfall. I’d quickly ask them if they had heard the forecast for snow and question why they had not planned for the probability of slower traffic. I guess that was just the “northerner” in me…smiles.

When at College and University it was always a joyous time of year to have the first snow arrive. Sometimes it meant that expectations were lowered on arrival to class. On the way to class, there would be numerous snowball clashes. It was always a bit humorous to see who was prepared with boots or still wearing running shoes or less that appropriate footwear for the conditions.

As a parent with young children, the first snowfall was always magical. The joy of that first snowfall and just getting the chance to get out and romp around in the snow was such a heartwarming sight to see. Even our two Portuguese water dogs over the years loved to see that first snowfall and desired a walk in the white stuff.

In many parts of Canada, the first snowfall is the true mark of a change in season. In many areas that means that the winter has truly started and here to stay. In Toronto, it means that it will be a little inconvenient as the plows figure out what streets to plow (if they plow) and that is is going to be sloppy for a few days. However, in Toronto, it likely means that it is truly a passing fancy. Gone are the days where snow arrives and stays for months, let alone weeks.

So as Neil would suggest, that first snowfall puts us in a context for nostalgia and stories of years gone by.

Bring on the first snowfall. We’re ready.

PHOTO credit Helena Devins – she is one of those stalwart fans of winter.

Enjoy.

@fergdevins